A thousand days

I’ve been on my own for a thousand days, following a bit more than twenty-two years of marriage—and I don’t want to calculate how many days that was. It feels good: every day a bit further from a long shadow.

But I’m not sure one can ever completely escape it. I’m no longer in my twenties. I’m not certain any more that a full-time, long-term relationship is a desirable or even a natural thing—see for instance Sex at Dawn: The Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality. And starting something now feels different; looking at dating site profiles I sense the scent of real desperation. But I’m not desperate, despite occasional loneliness and except in the sense that Leonard Cohen lamented regarding a time of life still distant to me: ‘one just wishes for someone to have dinner with now and then’ (I couldn’t find the original quote).

It’s mostly the possibility of a life of interminable financial servitude to my ex that supplies some sense of regret—not for the divorce but for the whole sorry story in the first place—and I think I must know a little of how the convict feels. The only advice I can offer here is: be damned sure; check the laws of your province/state and country, as in certain situations they certainly do not favour men; and consider pre-nuptials.

Here’s a (large) sparkline of my weight since my separation: hey, why not? Another data point.

F. Scott Fitzgerald apparently wrote that “there are no second acts in American lives.” I have no idea what book that might have been from, because I haven’t read him. In fact I first encountered the quote in a review of a Springsteen album when I was young, said album—The River (1980)—being devoted to identifying and exploring said second acts. Anyway, I’m Canadian. But I think the matter is undecided. Working with more limited financial and temporal resources, it’s not entirely down to will.

Shall I wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach? The fuck if I know. But it’s good to live near the ocean.

2009 Môreson Miss Molly In My Bed

Medium-plus ruby red in the glass. Almost-medium intensity appealing nose of deep black fruit, red cherry, and wood fire. Dry, medium acidity and medium-plus tannins. Medium body, nicely balanced Merlot and Cabernet: blackberry and plum, oak and a touch of coffee; 14% alcohol. Medium length. Overall good. A gift from my father; I believe this was about $30 at Kits Wine. See Môreson Family Winery.

Môreson Miss Molly In My Bed 2009

Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir 2008

Medium deep ruby with a garnet rim. Beautiful light nose of red cherry, strawberry, and fall forest—perfect complement to this drizzling but beautiful Vancouver day. Dry with a hint of residual sweetness, mid acidity, low tannins and light-plus body. Red fruits dominate, nicely balanced but with a bit of medicinal quality (also noted by a taster on CellarTracker). Good length. 14.2% alcohol. Overall good. $48 at Legacy Liquor Store. See Domaine Carneros.

Domaine Carneros Pinot Noir 2008

2010 Catena Malbec

Medium ruby and a slight purple tint. Medium nose of plums and sour cherry, spice and damp. Dry, medium-plus acidity, mid tannins, and a light-ish body. Dominated by sour cherry and general black fruits, with tasteful oak. Medium length with a finish that falls off in terms of flavours quite quickly. 13.5% alcohol. Overall good. $26.50 at Steamworks. See Bodega Catena Zapata.

2010 Catena Malbec

Ricossa Barolo 2008

Clear, medium ruby in the glass. Medium intensity nose of cherries and prunes, wood and tar. Dry, strong acidity and medium tannins in a medium body. Sharp red and dark cherries and dried fruits with subtle oaking. Real bite from 14% alcohol. Medium length. Overall good; will have to try more Nebbiolo to give this a bit more context.

$39 at Kitsilano Wine Cellar. See Touchstone Wines.

Drinking this with Portobellos Stuffed with Creamy Spinach from Big Vegan.

Ricossa Barolo 2008

 

Rippon Jeunesse Young Vines Riesling 2009

Clear, pale silver-green in the glass. Very light nose of grapefruit and perhaps a hint of greenness. Off-dry, high acidity, and a bit more than a light body. An overall slightly watery mix of citrus and sort of generic sweetness with some minerality. Blends well but is weak; not much length as a result. Is this the result of the “young vines”? Intriguing. I don’t dislike it, but I’d be curious to see how it evolves in future vintages. 11% alcohol. Overall good. $34.60 at Crosstown, which seems a bit dear. See Rippon Vineyard.

Rippon Jeunesse Young Vines Riesling 2009